Category: The Meaning of Feminism (page 1 of 4)

Feminism and Facts

Content note – contains discussion of sexual violence and low rape conviction rape.
Trigger Warning for rape.

What is the legal definition of rape in the UK? In all the conversations I’ve had about rape, responsibility and consent, I’d never thought about what is actually being contested when an allegation of rape makes it to court. I don’t think I’m alone in that. Under the Sexual Offences Act of 2003, this is the definition of rape:

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Collaborative round-up for anti-DSK blogs, media, videos, responses and thoughts

Perhaps this thread can be a resource to share responses to and coverage of the anti-DSK protest/movement that have been written elsewhere? (Not to prevent anyone from writing their own separate responses on GA) I feel that I am still recovering and trying to process what happened, it was so important to me, and I don’t want to lose or forget that so much was created. Please add things I have missed. I have purposefully left off “The Cambridge Student’s” “coverage”, see here: http://www.facebook.com/events/334401786597637/?ref=ts
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Humanitas Visiting Professor in Women’s Rights 2011

Professor Nancy Fraser (Henry A. and Louise Loeb Professor of Philosophy and Politics, The New School for Social Research, New York)

Lecture 1: ‘A Polanyian Feminism? Re-reading The Great Transformation in the 21st Century’ (5-6.30pm, 8 March 2011)

Karl Polanyi’s 1944 book ‘The Great Transformation’ rejected economism and instead analysed the previous crisis of capitalism as a crisis of social reproduction. He traced the roots of crisi…s to what he called the “fictitious commodification” of labour, land and money and diagnosed the tendency of a “free market society” to undermine the shared understandings that underpin social life. In his view, 19th-century efforts to create such a society proved so destructive of livelihoods, communities, and habitats as to trigger a century-long struggle between free-marketeers and those who sought to protect society from the ravages of the market. The end result of this “double movement” (marketisation versus social protection) was economic depression, political stalemate, and world war.

In the first lecture, Professor Nancy Fraser will reread ‘The Great Transformation’ from a feminist perspective, identifying the strengths and weaknesses of its signature concepts. Although it was developed for an earlier era, Polanyi’s diagnosis is, Professor Nancy Fraser will argue, highly relevant today as today’s crisis is not merely economic but also encompasses social reproduction and thus can be fruitfully analysed as a “great transformation,” in which a new round of efforts to commodify nature, labour, and money is sparking a new round of struggles. The following lectures and symposium will build upon this to create a Polanyian-feminist framework for theorising capitalist crisis in the 21st century.

Further lectures in the series are:

‘The Wages of Care: Reproductive Labour as Fictitious Commodity’
Wednesday, 9 Mar 2011

‘Between Marketisation and Social Protection: Ambivalences of Feminism in the Context of Capitalist Crisis’
Wednesday, 16 Mar 2011

A symposium will take place on Thursday 17 March.

For more information, please see http://www.crassh.cam.ac.uk/events/1534/.

Return to Gaga

To follow from earlier discussion of Lady Gaga, this lecture gives probably the best account I’ve heard about why I should be excited to live in the Gaga era. The discussion of Gaga herself comes in the last 3 minutes or so, but there’s some fascinating points made on gender-revolution in the middle, and the bit at the start about

“When you see something and you know this is feminism, but you don’t know why.”

…is just awesome. Continue reading

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